Fall 2018
A Voyage Around the World
Voyage Overview

A Voyage Around the World

106 Days, 11 Countries, 13 Cities, 4 Continents

Visiting Europe, Africa, Asia, and North America, this voyage gives participants a truly global comparative experience as the ship explores various cultures around the world.

Embark: Sep 9, Bremerhaven, Germany Disembark: Dec 23, San Diego, CA

Itinerary: Spain, Ghana, South Africa, Mauritius, India, Myanmar (Burma), Việt Nam, China, Japan, Hawaii, United States Apply Now
Embark Sep 9 Bremerhaven, Germany
Spain
Sep 15 - Sep 18
Spain
Port of Barcelona: Sep 15 - 16, Port of Valencia: Sep 17 - 18

Spain’s diverse landscape, architecture, art, and cuisine make the country rich in culture and charm. We will dock in Barcelona, one of the Mediterranean’s busiest ports, where you can explore the spectacular architecture of the Catalan capital, including Antoni Gaudí’s Sagrada Familia church. Sports enthusiasts enjoy a visit to Camp Nou, Barcelona’s soccer stadium and home to the Barca team. On the outskirts of the city, you will find the Montserrat mountain range as well as beautiful beaches.

Ghana
Sep 27 - Sep 30
Ghana
Tema Harbour

Located along the Gold Coast of Africa, on the Gulf of Guinea, Ghana is a country of incredible historical and cultural significance, and vast ecological resources. Settled in the 16th century, Ghana was a key player in the African slave trade, making the infamous Cape Coast Castle and slave dungeons in the country’s capital of Accra significant historical aspects of this destination. The natural beauty of the sub-Saharan country of Ghana can be well appreciated by exploring its Wli Waterfalls, located within one of West Africa’s few-surviving tropical rain forests. The Shai Hills Game Reserve of Ghana is home to the original wildlife of central Africa, including antelope, baboons, monkeys, and many bird species. In the southeastern region of Ghana, Ghana’s hydroelectric Akosombo Dam serves as the origination point for Lake Volta, the world’s largest manmade lake. The people of Ghana and its unique, thriving culture can best be experienced through homestays in local villages. SAS in-country programming in Ghana offers opportunities for pre-arranged homestays, treks through the Accra plains and neighboring nature reserves, pottery-making and kente-weaving with villagers. SAS also offers the opportunity to incorporate service projects at local schools and orphanages into this Ghanaian experience as well as the rare chance to receive a traditional African name in an official naming ceremony.

South Africa
Oct 7 - Oct 12
South Africa
Port of Cape Town

The southernmost country on the African continent, the Republic of South Africa is surrounded by the Atlantic and Indian Oceans to the west, south, and east, and is bordered by five countries to the north. South Africa’s Cape Town and other port cities were founded by Dutch traders in the mid-1600s, then established and later ruled by the British in the 1800s. Such prosperous natural resources as diamonds and gold, combined with its prime trade location, led to struggles of power and ultimately the formation of the Union of South Africa at the turn of the 19th century, followed by the modern-day Republic of South Africa. After nearly half a century of race and power debates, leaders including Nelson Mandela joined forces to bring an end to apartheid. SAS has ties with notable leaders of change and religion in South Africa, including Nelson Mandela and Archbishop Desmond Tutu.

Mauritius
Oct 19 - Oct 19
Mauritius
Port Louis Harbour

In Mauritius, you will find an enchanting blend of Indian, Chinese, African, French, and British influence. The island nation can be found in the Indian Ocean off the southeastern coast of Africa. Removed from major colonial shipping routes, it remained uninhabited until the 16th century, allowing the country to develop into one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots. Mauritius is encircled by the world’s longest unbroken coral reef, making it a perfect destination for scuba diving, snorkeling, and swimming.

Mauritius is one of the wealthiest countries in Africa, yet you’ll notice the relaxed charm and friendly co-existence of its warm and welcoming inhabitants. Because of its multicultural background, Mauritius is home to an eclectic style of cuisine, music, and dance. Port Louis is full of sights and sounds that make people never want to leave this paradise on earth. Scenic mountains, beautiful blue waters, wildlife and stunning cultural sites make this SAS opportunity one you will never forget.

India
Oct 25 - Oct 30
India
Cochin Port

Bordering the Indian Ocean, the Bay of Bengal, and the Arabian Sea, the South Asian country of India is one of the oldest civilizations in the world, dating back to 3,000 BC. India is currently one of the largest and most populous countries in the world, and is the point of origin for four of the world’s major religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism. Additionally, India comprises the world’s largest democracy and gained its independence in the 1940s under the peaceful leadership of Mahatma Gandhi.

In 1982, India’s Prime Minister Indira Gandhi came aboard the SAS floating campus to address students and faculty as an Interport Lecturer. SAS participants often identify India as the “turning point” of the world voyage. It is a country that takes them out of their comfort zone, challenges their senses, and awakens a sense of beauty and appreciation for humanity that is unparalleled. As part of the SAS in-country program, participants visit the bustling city of Delhi, witness the splendor of the Taj Mahal at dusk, and float down the River Ganges, experiencing a centuries-old religious practice. Pilgrims line the banks of the river at dawn each day to immerse themselves in the holy waters and pray to release their souls from the cycle of rebirth. It is an unforgettable experience, especially when paired with the opportunity to visit the ruins of temples, travel the streets of Varanasi in a rickshaw, and spend a night in Delhi.

Myanmar (Burma)
Nov 4 - Nov 8
Myanmar (Burma)
Port of Yangon

Burma, also known as Myanmar, has had a tumultuous past. Military authorities within the country have pushed for Myanmar to become the conventional name of the nation-state, although the name Burma is officially recognized by the United States government. Originally under British control as a province of India, it became a self-governing colony in 1937 and gained its independence froth the British Commonwealth in 1948. There has been political and civil unrest since 1990, with the Nobel Prize laureate and main opposition party leader Aung San Suu Kyi being held under house arrest from 1989 to 1995, 2000 to 2002 and 2003 to 2010. Many political reforms were put into place starting in April 2012; the government has released many political prisoners, reduced media censorship and created a more open debate process in Parliament. Now that the political climate has stabilized, Burma is now accessible and safe for travelling. With this access, international enthusiasm for travel in Burma has created new pressures on the infrastructure. Hotel, transportation and other related travel services are in high demand.

Although it is a resource-rich country, its economy has struggled to develop and have suffered from economic sanctions placed on it by the United States, Canada and the European Union due to its political situation. Burma’s 54 million residents share a geographical area slightly smaller than the U.S. state of Texas. Nearly 9 out of 10 Burmese citizens are Buddhist, but there are also small groups of Christians, Muslims and Animists within the country. A total of 135 ethnic minority and/or indigenous populations reside within Burma, each with their own language and customary dress. Well-preserved traditions of the Burmese remain intact despite increasing modernization- it can feel like you’re stepping into another world and time period. Experience one of the greatest wonders of the religious world, its enchanting floating villages and gardens, tea shops, and Buddhist monasteries.

Việt Nam
Nov 14 - Nov 18
Việt Nam
Port of Ho Chi Minh City

Vietnam, in Southeast Asia, stretches 1,600 kilometers (1,000 miles) north to south, but is only about 40 kilometers (25 miles) wide at its narrowest point near the country’s center. The Red River delta lowlands in the north are separated from the huge Mekong Delta in the south by long, narrow coastal plains backed by the forested Annam highlands. Hanoi, the capital, is the main city on the Red River and Ho Chi Minh City, or Saigon, is the main city on the Mekong. Vietnam also serves as the gateway to Cambodia for SAS voyagers. The temples of Angkor Wat and the rich history of Phnom Phen are a perennial favorite for students.

China
Nov 24 - Nov 29
China
Shanghai International Port

A leading region of civilization and culture for thousands of years, China originally outpaced most developing nations in terms of growth and industrialization. At the start of the 20th century, civil unrest and political destruction ensued, and following World War II, the social order was reinstated through the establishment of an autocratic system of government. The modern-day People’s Republic of China has reemerged as a leader in economic output and a collaborator in global exchange. It is the most populous country in the world and is home to a wide range of culture, language, customs and economic levels.

The famous Great Wall of China, which dates back to 206 BC, was constructed over thousands of years by several dynasties and is a highlight of the SAS in-country program in China. Other sites of exploration for SAS participants include the Imperial Palace and the Forbidden City in Beijing, Tiananmen Square, the spectacular terracing of Guilin, and the fertile valleys of the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers.

Traditional Japanese culture example
Japan
Dec 2 - Dec 6
Japan
Port of Kobe

The island nation of Japan, located in the Pacific Ocean, east of China, N. and S. Korea, and Russia, was first documented in the first century AD. The development of the nation was influenced by surrounding countries and cultures as well as periods of isolation, followed by its success in several wars. Currently, Japan is one of the world’s strongest economic powers and is a constitutional monarchy with an emperor and parliament. Despite Japan’s growing global influence in modern technology, it is undeniable that the country’s cultural traditions and customs continue to be practiced.

SAS participants in Japan have the opportunity to explore the unique aspects of Japan’s economic, philosophic, and religious systems. Visits to monumental historical sites display the country’s war and post-colonial past, while sacred shrines, gardens and volcanic parks leave visitors awestruck with Japan’s natural beauty.

Hawaii, United States
Dec 16 - Dec 16
Hawaii, United States
Port of Honolulu

The “Aloha spirit” is universal, and certainly contagious, when you set foot onto the Pacific paradise of Hawaii and the port of Honolulu. The small, archipelago state presents a beautiful tapestry of natural sights, including secluded beaches, magnificent waterfalls, and a vast rainforest filled with fauna. Among the extensive list of geographic must-sees are Diamond Head State Monument and Hanauma Bay. Consider a visit to the USS Arizona Memorial too as we prepare to sail towards Japan and explore the evolution of Japanese-American relations since the Second World War.

Please note, due to the short port calls in Hawaii and Mauritius (these are essentially fuel stops rather than SAS-style port calls of 4-6 days), those who wish to disembark must be enrolled in either a Field Class or an SAS Field Program. This applies to ALL passengers.

Disembark Dec 23 San Diego, CA