A Warm Welcome in Cuba

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lhanson
Dec 5, 2014


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Culture, Education, History, Student Life

A Warm Welcome in Cuba

Fall 2014 voyagers arrive with their Cuban counterparts at the Universidad de la Habana.
Fall 2014 voyagers arrive with their Cuban counterparts to the University of Havana for an education on the country’s culture.

For many Americans, traveling to the Republic of Cuba is not an option. But for Fall 2014 voyagers, they are now included in the lucky few to explore a place that remains relatively pure and untouched by its surrounding nations.

As the ship pulled into the port of Havana at sunrise, the warmth shined over the city, lighting the old stone fortress on one side and the antique cars passing on the other. The entry into the port at daybreak was just the beginning of a warm reception from the country of Cuba.

Executive Dean Sue Weitz addresses the students.
Executive Dean Sue Weitz addresses the joint group of students at the University of Havana. “The prospect of establishing a healthier relationship with Cuba can only be achieved by having the people of both countries understand one another,” said Weitz.

Meeting the ship as it arrived, leadership from the University of Havana came on board to officially welcome the voyage to their country. “Well, you’re finally in Cuba. And we see you’ve kept the best for last,” shared Rector Gustavo Cobreiro Suárez, through a translator. “We want you to know that the Cuban people are friends of the American people. We respect your culture… And we hope that one day for an American to travel to Cuba will be the most natural thing.”

The Fall 2014 voyage was the largest academic group sponsored by an American institution to enter Cuba in recent history. For Semester at Sea, this was only its twelfth visit to this country in the program’s storied 51-year history. Granted access for the purpose of education, all community members engaged in a day full of programming by the University of Havana about the nation’s history, politics, and youth culture.

Song and dance were performed at the welcome reception.
Students watched on as cultural performances graced the stage at the welcome reception. They even joined in with their own song and dance after the show concluded.

But the voyage’s introduction to Cuba was much more than a series of lectures. Breaking into song and dance in the university’s quad, the Cuban students proved there was more to their culture than what could be learned from textbooks and the media. A spirited population driven by their love of movement, music, and pure happiness, the students beamed with a joy that was instantly contagious within the shipboard community.

Divided by a 54-year embargo but joined by a passion for world friendship, Cuba looked for this experience to be a positive step in bettering their relationship with the United States. Throughout the four days spent in the country, students engaged in numerous opportunities for a people-to-people education. “The prospect of establishing a healthier relationship with Cuba can only be achieved by having the people of both countries understand one another. Our visit provided an opportunity for our students to connect with University of Havana students intellectually, socially, and emotionally,” said Executive Dean, Sue Weitz. Coming from many cultures of significant political differences, their time in Cuba shed light on the two countries’ similarities and differences. Both sides were able to gain new perspectives and be introduced to issues of controversy and human rights that were previously unknown to many. “I hope the student to student exchange will stimulate them to be deeper critical thinkers and compassionate human companions,” added Weitz.

Students arrive at the Universidad de la Habana.
Students climbed the steps at the entrance to the University of Havana, side by side with their Cuban peers.

But in all the smiles exchanged, thoughtful gestures of diplomacy, and cultural experiences, the most moving moments in Havana were probably the first and last. After initially setting foot on Cuban soil, the shipboard community arrived at the university and stood at the bottom of a daunting set of 88 steps. Lining them were local students who had come out on a Saturday morning to greet the voyagers. As John Lennon’s Imagine was played over the outdoor speaker system and both sets climbed side by side, a bond of friendship and peace immediately formed between the two groups. “In that moment I couldn’t help but think about how amazing this feat truly was considering our past,” said Jade McGuire, student from The University of Maine.

Four days later as their time in Cuba came to a close, students stood aboard the MV Explorer waving to the Cuban students, thanking them for their hospitality. As Jack Johnson’s cover of Imagine played over the ship’s external speakers, the community reciprocated the gesture extended days prior and dedicated the song to their new friends. As a mix of smiles and tears washed over both sides, hopes and dreams of the world living as one then had never felt so real.

Photos by: Joshua Gates Weisberg

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2 Comments

  1. Manuel Ramio
    December 7, 2014 at 6:09 pm

    We want to get closer to the Castro regime.
    What about human rights, free democratic elections, freedom for political prisioners that they claim that there are none.
    What about stop mistreating and putting in jail for a couple Of days any one that does not agree with their totalitarian communist philosophy? Like with the Damas de Blanco? Do we want to get closer without any conditions?

    Money first, human rights second.

    Is that fair???

  2. Raymond FA14
    December 11, 2014 at 11:42 am

    Education should transcend Politics, and IT DID on this Voyage as over 700 Americans were able to experience first hand the warm welcome extended by the people of Cuba.

    Notice on the jerseys provided by The University of Havana to our SAS Basketball teams : it says USA and not SAS.
    Remember that back in the 70‘s, the thawing of US-China relationship started with an invitation (by the other side) to a Ping-Pong match. The Basketball is now in our court. Can some of our elected Politicians shoot the ball over the rather TALL Guards (paid for by special interest) ?

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