Student Photo Gallery: China and Hong Kong

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lhanson
Feb 23, 2015


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Student Photo Gallery: China and Hong Kong

The Spring 2015 Voyage docked in both Shanghai and Hong Kong over the course of six days.  Below are some of the shipboard community’s photos from those six days:

Olivia Vanni from the University of Montana photographed these bamboo rafts waiting for repair on the Yulong River that connects Guilin to Yangshuo.
Olivia Vanni from the University of Montana photographed these bamboo rafts waiting for repair on the Yulong River that connects Guilin to Yangshuo.
Jean-Michel M'Bouroukounda, an Anthropology student from  CU Boulder, captured a long exposure of the Hong Kong skyline from the MV Explorer.
Jean-Michel M’Bouroukounda, an Anthropology student from the University of Colorado Boulder, captured a long exposure of the Hong Kong skyline from the MV Explorer.
While in Shanghai, Josh Liberman from the University of Miami visited the Shanghai Museum in the People's Square.  This piece is called 'Thousand Buddhist Stele' and came from Northern Zhou.  It is estimated to have been made between 557 and 581 A.D.
While in Shanghai, Josh Liberman from the University of Miami visited the Shanghai Museum in the People’s Square. This piece is called ‘Thousand Buddhist Stele’ and came from Northern Zhou. It is estimated to have been made between 557 and 581 A.D.
Lauren Oates from the University of Tampa photographed this Red Panda at the Shanghai Zoo.  The Red Panda is native to the Himalayas and southern China.
Lauren Oates from the University of Tampa photographed this Red Panda at the Shanghai Zoo. The Red Panda is native to the Himalayas and southern China.
Great Wall Hike 1672_Alex Meyer
Staff member Alex Meyer hiked the Great Wall of China with a field program. The hike started on a remote part of the wall in Miyun County and covered about ten miles.
While inside the Confucian Temple in Shanghai, Hannah Zdanowitz from Front Range Community College found these red and yellow cards hanging on trees.  The cards are prayers for the Chinese New Year.
While inside the Confucian Temple in Shanghai, Hannah Zdanowitz, a postgrad student from the University of Colorado Boulder, found these red and yellow cards hanging on trees. The cards are prayers for the Chinese New Year.
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