Adolescent/Early Adult Development in Context [CRN 17868]

311:
Discipline: Human Development and Family Studies
Instructor: Jay
Credits: 3
Day: A
Start: 0940
End: 1100
Field Work: Day 6 | March 5, 2020 | India
Prerequisites: One (1) introductory Individual and Family Development course OR one (1) general Psychology course OR by permission of instructor Download Syllabus

Did you know that 80% of life’s most defining moments take place by the age of 35? Join the author of The Defining Decade—and the psychologist behind TED’s “Why 30 Is Not the New 20”—on this journey through the twenty-something years. Explore the unique neurological, biological, cognitive, social, personality, and identity development of individuals aged 18 to 35. Topics include:

  • Why “Who am I?” is a question best answered not with a protracted identity crisis, but with one or two good pieces of something called identity capital
  • How joining the world of work can make us feel better, not worse
  • Why it’s the people we hardly know who will change our lives for the better
  • How the twentysomething brain gives us our best chance to change who we are
  • Why living together may not be the best way to test a relationship
  • How we pick our families and not just our friends

Along the way, discover how young adulthood is culturally constructed, and how it intersects with gender, race and class. Be prepared to look ahead to life after college—and to leave the course with a plan to make the most of your own defining moments ahead.

Field Work

Country: India
Day: 6
Date: March 5, 2020

This class is a “university exchange” in which students from the course will meet and exchange ideas about young adulthood in India, as well as reactions to The Defining Decade, with college students in India.

Learning Objectives:
1. Be curious about how culture intersects with young adult development
2. Learn what it is like to be a young adult in India (eg, how it is similar or different)
3. Learn about how gendered young adult norms in India do or do not differ from those in the US