Global Communication Technologies [CRN 27386]

416:
Discipline: Journalism and Media Communication
Instructor: Seel
Credits: 3
Day: B
Start: 10:40
End: 12:00
Field Class: Day 2 | January 25, 2017 | Japan
Prerequisites: One (1) newswriting course Download Syllabus

This is a course about global information and communication technologies (ICT) and their effects on society, with a primary focus on the creation, evolution, and future of the global Internet. Related technologies such as mobile telephony, broadcasting, teleconferencing, and virtual/augmented realities will also be examined.  The shift of ICT services to the Internet “Cloud” and its implications for global telecommunication will be a central area of study.  Internet applications such as social networks, games, and teleconferencing will be analyzed in terms of social effects.  Key communication theories related to ICT will be studied and applied in relevant areas. Universal social issues that transcend media boundaries such as worldwide inequality of access, privacy infringement, and international censorship will also be examined in detail.

Field Class

Country: Japan
Day: 2
Date: January 25, 2017

The class will travel 25 miles by bus from the ship in Kobe to the center of nearby Osaka, the second largest city in Japan (after Tokyo). In the three floors of Panasonic exhibits in the enormous Grand Front center, we’ll review the evolution of communication technology from the diffusion of radio in Japan, the arrival of television after WWII, and the diffusion of the Internet since the 1980s. We’ll examine the state of communication and digital technology in Japan, which has been a pioneer in these fields since World War II. At the Osaka Science and Technology Museum, we’ll examine the state of the art in all technologies in Japan, including nuclear power, which has been in crisis mode since the Fukushima reactor meltdown after a devastating tsunami in March of 2011.

While there we’ll review the evolution of computer and video game culture in Japan with game programmer and director Nathan Heckel (who develops game for Nintendo) and a Japanese colleague in game development. We will visit a nearby video game arcade where students will have an opportunity to play some of the games. Finally, we’ll make a brief photo stop outside Osaka Castle at the end of the day to illustrate the concept of the “death of distance” (created by modern telecommunication technology) by live blogging the visit on social media and then noting the immediate responses from the U.S. (near midnight Pacific time).

Learning Objectives:
1. At the Panasonic exhibits, we’ll review the evolution of communication technology from the diffusion of radio in Japan, the arrival of television after WWII, and the diffusion of the Internet since the 1980s. We’ll examine the state of communication and digital technology in Japan, which has been a pioneer in these fields since World War II.
2. At OSTEC, we’ll examine the state of the art in all technologies in Japan, including nuclear power, which has been in crisis mode since the Fukushima reactor meltdown.
3. With game developer Nathan Heckel we’ll review the evolution of computer and video game culture in Japan, the localization of games developed elsewhere in the world for Japanese players, and discuss how computer technology (e.g. the keyboard) is altering how the Japanese write their own language.
4. At the video game arcade we will observe Japanese game culture and play some of the games.
5. The photo stop at Osaka Castle at the end of the day will illustrate the concept of the “death of distance” (created by modern telecommunication technology) by live blogging the stop in social media and then noting the immediate responses from the U.S. (after midnight Colorado time).